Image Credits: Turning Point USA

“Do you have any plans after college?” If I had a nickel for every time I heard that in the weeks leading up to my graduation, I would have enough money to pay off my student loans. Thankfully, I had an answer to this question. I would be working as a field representative for an incredible conservative organization in the fall. As the founder of a club at my alma mater, I was familiar with the work that field representatives did and would help them recruit when they came to campus. I was excited to get started and help conservative students find a voice on their often liberal college campuses.

For four months, I found myself traveling to and from campuses big and small. I was preaching the good news about limited government, the Second Amendment, and the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. My term ended faster than you could say “Hey, do you like liberty?” but I ended it with memories and skills that will last a lifetime. Here is why you should consider working as a field representative for a conservative organization.

1) You will learn valuable life skills

One of the best ways to improve your organizational and leadership skills is to work as a field representative. You are in charge of searching for potential activists, setting up tabling events, building chapters from the ground up, and advising them on how to hold meetings and events. You also have to be able to organize and manage large amounts of data and contact information for each school you attend.

When ninety percent of your job is going up to people and talking to them about hot-button issues such as the national debt, the right to life, or guns, you’re going to be able to use this job to strengthen your public speaking skills. This will pay off later in life if you work in the political world.

2) You get to travel…a lot

One of the perks of being a field rep is lots of traveling. During my term, I covered every inch of Maryland and Delaware. From the mountain towns of Western Maryland that are a literal stone’s throw away from West Virginia, to the Eastern Shore that has tried to secede in the past. If you’re a recent college graduate, this is a fun way to relive your glory days of being a loud and proud conservative on campus…after campus, after campus. You get to work student organization fairs, talk to students in between classes and roll around free speech balls on a weekly basis.

3) You will help change the conversation on campus  

It is no secret that young conservatives aren’t viewed as the coolest kids on campus. The idea of diversity at some schools is to have everyone look different, but think the same way on every issue. As a field rep, you have the opportunity to help conservative students find their voices on campus and fight back against liberal bias. You are able to provide them with resources like media attention and legal counsel in order to make sure that their voices are heard and respected.

While working as a field rep, I was informed of a faculty-led walkout scheduled after Donald Trump won the election. I helped send the information to Campus Reform. The piece wound up on Hannity. Alumni who were watching that night were able to see what was going on at their alma mater, which could make them reconsider making a donation in the future.

In the conservative movement, there are plenty of opportunities to become a field representative. Several major organizations including the Leadership Institute, Turning Point USA, and Young Americans for Liberty have field programs where you can help conservative students change the conversation on campus. During and after the historic 2016 presidential election, more people were paying attention to millennials who are active in politics. Now is a great time to help them increase their influence on campus and push for change.

Melissa B
CONTRIBUTOR
Melissa is a young conservative navigating the world of post-grad one cup of coffee (or glass of wine) at a time. When she isn't volunteering on campaigns up and down the ballot in deep blue Maryland or trying to get selfies with politicians, you can find her reading, cheering on the Ravens, or hanging out with friends.