It’s no secret that today’s college campuses are bastions of liberal indoctrination and conservative hatred. What is a college conservative to do? Should we forgo college all together and jump right into the business world? Maybe, but let’s be honest, that path isn’t for everyone. We cannot simply allow the left to dominate college campuses for the foreseeable future. Instead, we conservatives must infiltrate and stand our ground. We should make strong arguments and spread our message of smaller government in hopes that it will resonate with even one soul. It is crucial that you are prepared for the liberal backlash you will face as a conservative on college campuses. You should be armed with facts and figures to convey your message effectively. Here are six books that every college conservative should read to prepare for a liberal campus.

1) No Campus for White Men by Scott Greer

In No Campus for White Men, Greer broadens the usual media focus well beyond coverage of demonstrations by easily offended college students, to spotlight the darker forces at work behind the scenes that are feeding higher education’s metastasizing crisis – and how all this results in sustained animosity, first and foremost, toward white men. Greer also documents how this starkly totalitarian culture is not isolated to higher education, but is rather a result of trends already operating in society. Thus, he shows, today’s campus madness may eventually dominate much more of America if it is not addressed and reversed soon.

 

2) End of Discussion by Guy Benson and Mary Katherine Ham

With a new foreword for the paperback edition reflecting Trump’s election and the recent uproar surrounding right-leaning speakers on college campuses, this unapologetic conservative duo featured on FOX News, Townhall, The Federalist, and CNN combat the silencing of free speech in America.They’re trying to silence you. But don’t let them dictate the End of Discussion. In the age of Trump, a prejudice against free speech is spreading, fueled by a growing movement that believes ideas must be squelched to “protect” people. The presidential election of 2016 should have been the clearest sign yet to the Left that trying to convince half the country to shut up is not the same as actually convincing them. And yet, in its wake, the impulse to stifle and punish “incorrect” viewpoints, and the “deplorables” who voice them, is alive and well. It’s a vicious and ironic cycle, especially in academia, where dissenting speech is deemed dangerous and equated to violence — while actual violence is justified to bully its proponents. From Berkeley to Middlebury, the mob is on the march.  

 

3) The Silencing by Kirsten Powers

 Lifelong liberal Kirsten Powers blasts the Left’s forced march towards conformity in an exposé of the illiberal war on free speech. No longer champions of tolerance and free speech, the “illiberal Left” now viciously attacks and silences anyone with alternative points of view.  Powers asks, “What ever happened to free speech in America?”

4) How to Debate Leftists and Destroy Them by Ben Shapiro

 The problem, as Ben Shapiro puts it in this must-read, is that “because conservatives don’t think about how to win that they constantly lose” in confrontations with leftists. The solution is to stop taking the bullying and learning to argue for victory. Among Shapiro’s rules for beating the left in confrontations are: Be willing to take a punch. (conservatives tend to shy away from confrontations because the left is rhetorically violent; but it is important “to walk toward the fire.” )  Hit hard, hit first. (leftists stage muggings; instead of fighting by Marquis of Queensberry rules, conservatives need to accept the strategy Mike Tyson: “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.”) Immediately frame the debate. (“When you’re discussing global warming , for example, the proper question is not whether man is causing global warming but whether man can fix global warming—a question to which the universally acknowledged answer is no unless we are willing to revert to the pre industrial age.”)  There are eight more rules that will allow a conservative to debate a leftist and destroy him. How to Debate Leftists and Destroy Them is not just a “how to” book. It is a survival manual.

5) Real Education: Four Simple Truths for Bringing America’s Schools Back to Reality by Charles Murray

 With four simple truths as his framework, Charles Murray, the bestselling coauthor of The Bell Curve, sweeps away the hypocrisy, wishful thinking, and upside-down priorities that grip America’s educational establishment. America’s future depends on how we educate the academically gifted. An elite already runs the country, whether we like it or not. Since everything we watch, hear, and read is produced by that elite, and since every business and government department is run by that elite, it is time to start thinking about the kind of education needed by the young people who will run the country. The task is not to give them more advanced technical training, but to give them an education that will make them into wiser adults; not to pamper them, but to hold their feet to the fire.  The good news is that change is not only possible but already happening. Real Education describes the technological and economic trends that are creating options for parents who want the right education for their children, teachers who want to be free to teach again, and young people who want to find something they love doing and learn how to do it well. These are the people for whom Real Education was written. It is they, not the politicians or the educational establishment, who will bring American schools back to reality.

 

6) The Closing of the American Mind by Allan Bloom 

 In 1987, eminent political philosopher Allan Bloom published The Closing of the American Mind, an appraisal of contemporary America that “hits with the approximate force and effect of electroshock therapy” (The New York Times) and has not only been vindicated, but has also become more urgent today. In clear, spirited prose, Bloom argues that the social and political crises of contemporary America are part of a larger intellectual crisis: the result of a dangerous narrowing of curiosity and exploration by the university elites.  Now, in this twenty-fifth anniversary edition, acclaimed author and journalist Andrew Ferguson contributes a new essay that describes why Bloom’s argument caused such a furor at publication and why our culture so deeply resists its truths today.

Aryssa D
FFL Cabinet Member