Image Credits: Courtesy of Madesen Gage

How She Got That Internship is a series that highlights conservative women’s internships in various organizations and positions to inspire the next generation of conservative women to lead. Did you, or a young woman that you know, have an internship experience you want to share with our readers? Submit it in this form and we will contact you if we think it would be a great fit for the series. 

Summer is perhaps the best time for young leaders to invest in themselves by gaining valuable work experience, namely through internships. As summer comes to a close and fall looms ahead, FFL is sitting down with a number interns to reflect on this year’s highlights and encourage more young leaders to apply for next year’s internships!

Madesen Gage is a student at Mizzou from northwest Missouri. Her family is comprised of farmers, and those who aren’t physically farming are taking care of the business as a whole.

How did you find out about the position, and why did you decide to apply?

The reason I am interning for Congressman Sam Graves is because he is my representative. I love seeing first hand how legislation is proposed and passed, especially when it concerns areas that are dear to my heart. Mr. Graves is a farmer himself, so there is always something to talk about between him and I. During my time here in Washington, I have handled constituent correspondence, answering phone calls and lending an ear for constituents, as well as giving tours of the U.S. Capitol. I typically aid in legislation that concerns anything related to agriculture.

What was the driving force behind choosing to work at as a House intern?

I was originally persuaded by people of my home district who told me I should apply for Congressman Graves’ internship program. They provided helpful recommendation letters and put in a good word for me, and here I am. I decided to apply because I love to serve people. What better way to do so than work for my Congressman? Better yet, I would be serving people who I know on a personal level. This internship has been nothing short of incredible and rewarding.

The driving force behind working as a House intern would be the fact that I could work for someone who came from the same place I did, while being in touch with constituents on a daily basis. I wanted to be serving my district, whereas if I had worked for Senator Roy Blunt, I would be serving all constituents of Missouri. Working in the House provides a much more personal connection with the staff as well as the people back home.

Have you interned in DC before? If so, where?

I have not interned in DC before, but would gladly do it again.

Describe a typical day at your internship.

A typical day in my internship would be to arrive at the office before the legislative team arrives. I would complete the daily office tasks of the morning which includes making coffee, distributing newspapers, changing agriculture commodity prices, as well as tidying up the office before meetings and constituents arrive. Throughout the day I respond to constituents as well as answer phones. I give tours of the Capitol a few times a week. Every now and then, I will attend committee hearings regarding anything related to agriculture. I also work on projects assigned from people within the office.

What has been the most rewarding aspect of working for the House of Representatives?

The most rewarding aspect of working on Hill would be the fact that I am serving the people that I’ve grown up with and have known my entire life. That includes my town as well as the surrounding communities. Also, watching my Congressman perform his job is truly inspiring. Another rewarding aspect that came from working on the Hill would be the lasting friendships and connections that I’ve made.

What was the biggest WOW moment of your internship?

The biggest ‘WOW’ moment of my internship was being able to attend FBI Agent Peter Strzok’s hearing. He testified before the House Judiciary Committee as well as the House Oversight Committee. Being in a room full of politicians who I’ve watched on the television was truly amazing.

Looking back over your time in the internship, what’s been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned as a result of your time working for the House of Representatives?

The most valuable lesson that I’ve learned as a result of my time on the Hill would be that it’s not what you know, it’s who you know. After the connection has been made, it’s your job to prove yourself. I’ve met so many people this summer that have opened multiple doors for me.

Would you apply to work at the House of Representatives again, and what advice would you give to future applicants?

I would most certainly apply to work in the House again. If I did apply, I may want to try working for a committee. Future applicants should really be knowledgeable about current legislation. A lot of time is spent on the phone conversing with constituents who have questions they want answered. It’s an intern’s job to leave a good impression with the person on the phone. Another piece I would give to future applicants is to make yourself stand out. Standing out on applications is always a good thing.

How She Got That Internship is a series that highlights conservative women’s internships in various organizations and positions to inspire the next generation of conservative women to lead. Did you, or a young woman that you know, have an internship experience you want to share with our readers? Submit it in this form and we will contact you if we think it would be a great fit for the series. 

Isabel B
CONTRIBUTOR
Isabel is a Contributor from the beautiful Rocky Mountains of Colorado and is a proud CSU Ram. She dreams of one day being a surgeon-turned-US President, and you can often spot her around campus wearing FFL gear and scrubs. She loves all things pro-life, second amendment, and small government, and is also involved in Turning Point USA and PragerFORCE